Easy Crockpot Bone Broth

Crockpot Bone Broth

This Easy Crockpot Bone Broth recipe is made from the scraps of a whole chicken, some veggies & spices in the slow cooker! Paleo, whole30 & budget friendly!

An overhead shot of Easy Crockpot Bone Broth in a glass mason jar on a glass backgroundAn overhead shot of Easy Crockpot Bone Broth in a glass mason jar on a glass background

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Once you give this Easy Crockpot Bone Broth a try, you’re going to fall in love!

It’s no secret that bone both has become increasingly popular over the past few years. You can now find bone broth at basically any grocery store, online, or even in some cafes/restaurants!

But.. you might be wondering.. what IS bone broth?

an overhead shot of a big pot of slow cooker bone brothan overhead shot of a big pot of slow cooker bone broth

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is the SAME thing as chicken stock or broth.

At it’s core, bone broth is really just soup made probably the same way your grandma used to make it… with bones that were either leftover from a meal, or that she got from a butcher (our gram’s still make it like this!).

The bone and vegetables cook low and slow, creating an extremely nutrient dense, delicious broth.

A glass of bone broth in front of a crockpotA glass of bone broth in front of a crockpot

You might be thinking.. if it’s broth.. what is so great about it? I wrote this entire post about Bone Broth Benefits, but I’ll outline them here.

Many people drink bone broth because it’s so nutrient packed. When the bones are cooked low and slow they release their naturally occurring collagen + gelatin which is thought to be great for your gut health, skin + nails!

P.S. – If you love crockpot recipes, check out these 45 Healthy Crockpot Recipes!

Bone Broth Benefits:

‘Gut’ health– If you look online you’ll find many people claiming they have a ‘leaky’ gut. While this isn’t a medical term, it is a real thing. Many people have chronic stomach pain, issues, or intolerances, coming from an unknown cause. Some holistic health coaches believe that these issues stem from small holes in the intestines. Bone broth is filled with gelatin and collagen, which many health coaches claim can help repair these holes, and alleviate stomach issues. (Source)

Fuller skin, lips, and healthier hair– When made with specific types of bones, broth can be loaded with collagen. Collagen allegedly helps to fill out the cells, and can give your skin a fuller, brighter appearance.

Strong joints– You may not be worried about your joints just yet, but if you’re older, or experience joint pain due to an injury or exercise – you’ve probably heard of or taken glucosamine. Most drug stores sell glucosamine in a liquid form or pill, and it can help protect your joints from pain and keep them healthy. 

Amino Acids-Amino acids are great for helping recover from your workout, but they can also help in a number of other areas including digestion and organ function. Most bone broths have a high level of Glutamine, Arginine, Proline and Glycine.

Yes, bone broth certainly requires a little bit of time and patience to make, but it really requires no labor and is incredibly easy to do! If you have a crockpot.. and leftover chicken (or chicken bones!) you’ll be good to go!

If you’re looking for other slow cooker recipes – check out these 28 Delicious Paleo Crockpot Recipes.

Ingredients for bone broth:

To make bone broth, you really only need:

  • bones
  • water

However, I like to throw in some extra veggies and herbs for flavor. Here I have some carrots, onions + celery as well as some thyme + rosemary.

Easy Crockpot Bone BrothEasy Crockpot Bone Broth

Other helpful tools: crockpot, strainer, nut milk bag, souper cubes (for storing)

Making the bone broth is really as easy as just filling your pot with water, and turning it on!

How to make crockpot bone broth:

  1. Add all ingredients to a crockpot (bones, scraps, fat, etc). Cover with filtered water and cook on low for at least 12 hours (16-18 is best).
  2. You may need to adjust the amount of water depending on the size of your crockpot. You can fill to the top of the crockpot!
  3. Allow broth to cool slightly, and run through a fine mesh strainer into a large pot or container.
  4. Storage: Store in airtight containers for up to 4 days, or put in the freezer until ready to use!
  5. Optional, but recommended: Carefully remove carrots, onions + celery from the strainer and place into blender. Puree in blender until smooth (You may need to add a little broth to the blender depending on it’s power)
  6. Stir veggie puree into strained broth and store in the refrigerator or freezer.

Substitutions for bone broth:

Bones – You can use any bones.. chicken, beef, or turkey will all work. We also have a Turkey Broth, Homemade Beef Bone Broth and Homemade Chicken Broth recipe.

Veggies – Carrots, celery, onion and garlic add flavor to the broth but are not necessary

Seasonings – You can add salt, pepper, or whatever other herbs you’d like to the broth. We love to throw thyme + rosemary into our broth!

Apple cider Vinegar – Some people add apple cider vinegar to their broth to help coax the nutrients out of the bones. This is not necessary, but if you’d like to add it – feel free!

What kind of bones should you use for bone broth?

My favorite way to make bone broth is with leftover bones from a whole chicken. After I’ve cooked the chicken, everything goes in the slow cooker and gets turned into broth!

You can use chicken, beef, turkey or pork bones. They can be raw, or cooked.

Easy Crockpot Bone BrothEasy Crockpot Bone Broth

(This broth has a more orange color because the broth has been blended with carrots, celery + onions)

I make my Easy Crockpot Bone Broth a little different from other people. Most people just strain the broth after it cooks + use/drink that. I take the veggies that cooked with the bones + puree them up to make the broth extra nutrient dense!

I find it adds even more flavor, and who doesn’t want to sneak in extra veggies?! You have to give it a try!

Can you cook bone broth for too long?

Technically, yes. If you go past the 24 hour mark – your broth might wind up turning out bitter or getting a weird flavor. I normally cook my slow cooker bone broth for about 18-20 hours, and have never had an issue with it, but I wouldn’t cook it for any longer!

Do you need to roast the bones for bone broth?

It depends. If you have already cooked a whole chicken, turkey, etc. You don’t need to roast the bones.

However, if you’re using raw bones (specifically beef) you should roast them. I like to quickly boil raw beef bones and then roast them at about 400 degrees for 20 minutes to remove any impurities from the bones. It results in a clearer broth and more flavor. Check out our Beef Bone Broth recipe for more details

Can you reuse the bones in bone broth?

People say that you can reuse the bones for bone broth, but I’ve never had success with this. Typically after cooking once, the bones are nearly disintegrating.

Whenever I’ve reused them, the broth has not been as gelatinous or flavorful as the first time using them!

My bone broth didn’t gel?

It’s ok if your bone broth doesn’t gel, and rest assured it will be just as nutritious! Certain bones/cuts of meat can create a more jello-like consistency with the broth.

You could also have added a little bit too much water. Either way, don’t worry – and enjoy it!

an overhead shot of bone broth in glass mason jars. it's a light yellow color, and swirling at the topan overhead shot of bone broth in glass mason jars. it's a light yellow color, and swirling at the top

Can you freeze bone broth?

You can freeze bone broth, and you probably will have to because this makes a lot!

I freeze my bone broth in glass mason jars, plastic containers, or ice cub trays. These silicone molds for soup are also a great way to freeze bone broth. Code CLEANEATING10 works to save $$

Freezing in glass: I don’t recommend freezing in glass. Liquid expands and it’s very easy for it to crack. To freeze in glass, fill the bottle leaving about 1-2 inches of room – do not fill to the top because the liquid will expand as it freezes. Put them in the fridge and allow them to completely cool. 

Once they have been in the fridge for at least 5 hours and are cold, you can transfer to the freezer. I leave the lids off and allow the jars to freeze completely, then add the lids on.

To defrost, I simply take out and put in the fridge the night before, or run under warm water.

Ice cube trays: I also like to freeze bone broth in ice cube trays. This is perfect for when you’re making a dish and only need a little bit, but don’t want to defrost a whole jar!

How long does bone broth last?

Bone broth will last 6-7 days in your refrigerator. If frozen, it can last up to a year – but I’d recommend using it within 6 months for freshness!

Bone broth frozen in ice cube trays on a grey backgroundBone broth frozen in ice cube trays on a grey background

Can you make this bone broth in the instant pot?

Yes, you can! I prefer to cook my bone broth in the slow cooker, but you can cook this in your instant pot for 120 minutes on high pressure, and let it naturally release. You can see our instant pot bone broth recipe here.

Depending on the size of your instant pot, you may need more or less water. Make sure you DO NOT fill above the max fill line! Leave about an inch and half before the max fill line.

3 glass mason jars filled with slow cooker bone broth3 glass mason jars filled with slow cooker bone broth

Ways to use Crockpot Bone Broth

You can use bone broth in so many different ways. Here are some of my favorites:

  • As the base of a delicious soup
  • Pour it in a mug and drink it up! It’s packed with protein + veggies and so cozy.
  • Add to sauces or stir fry’s for flavor
  • Use in place of water or regular cooking stock
  • Freeze it to have for a quick dinner or meal (or for when a cold comes on!)

We hope you love this as much as we do! We make this year round (basically anytime I cook a whole chicken!) and it’s a staple in our kitchen/freezer. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised with how easy + delicious it is!

Favorite Recipes From The Clean Eating Couple

A glass of bone broth in front of a crockpotA glass of bone broth in front of a crockpot

Easy Crockpot Bone Broth

5

from

35

votes

This Easy Crockpot Bone Broth is made from the scraps of a whole chicken, some veggies and spices in the slow cooker! Paleo, whole30 and budget friendly!

WW Freestyle Points

1

Prep Time :

5

minutes

Cook Time :

12

hours

Total Time :

12

hours

5

minutes

Serves :

4

people

(hover over # to adjust)

PRINT

Ingredients

  • 1

    lb

    bones from chicken or beef

    The more bones, the better. You can use the scraps from a whole roasted chicken or rotisserie chicken, or raw bones

  • 2

    cups

    celery stalks

    halved – optional

  • 1

    cup

    carrots

    halved – optional

  • 1

    cup

    onion

    quartered – optional

  • sprigs

    fresh thyme + rosemary

    optional

  • salt/pepper to taste

  • 8

    cups

    water

    (approximately, fill to the top of your crockpot)

Instructions

  • Add all ingredients to a crockpot (bones, scraps, fat, etc). Cover with filtered water and cook on low for at least 12 hours (16-18 is best).

  • You may need to adjust the amount of water depending on the size of your crockpot. You can fill to the top of the crockpot!

  • Allow broth to cool slightly, and run through a fine mesh strainer into a large pot or container. (This will just be easier to do if it is not scalding hot).

  • Storage: Store in airtight containers for up to 4 days, or put in the freezer until ready to use!

  • Optional, but recommended: Carefully remove carrots, onions + celery from the strainer and place into blender. Puree in blender until smooth (You may need to add a little broth to the blender depending on it’s power)

  • Stir veggie puree into strained broth and store in the refrigerator or freezer.

Video

Notes

Can you make this bone broth in the instant pot?

Yes, you can! I prefer to cook my bone broth in the slow cooker, but you can cook this in your instant pot for 120 minutes on high pressure. Depending on the size of your instant pot, you may need more or less water. Make sure you DO NOT fill above the max fill line! Leave about an inch and half before the max fill line.

 

Storage:

Store in airtight containers for up to 4 days, or put in the freezer until ready to use!

Nutrition Facts

Nutrition Facts

Easy Crockpot Bone Broth

Amount Per Serving (1 cup)

Calories 65

Calories from Fat 18

% Daily Value*

Fat 2g

3%

Sodium 87mg

4%

Potassium 454mg

13%

Fiber 4g

17%

Sugar 4g

4%

Protein 6g

12%

Vitamin A 11015IU

220%

Vitamin C 26.3mg

32%

Calcium 68mg

7%

Iron 0.9mg

5%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. This is an estimate and can vary pending your ingredients

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